Play Ping-Pong & Build Legacy

Nobody thinks ‘medium-term’.
Generally, we think short-term. Occasionally, long-term.
When you have short term in one hand, and long term in the other, there are trade-offs. But it’s not like you think ‘short-term’ Monday to Friday, and longer-term on the weekend.

So, how do people do this? How do you hold short-term & long-term in both hands, at the same time?

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About Donna Kennedy-Glans

About Donna Kennedy-Glans Over a 34-year career, I’ve worked as a politician, a writer, an energy expert, a lawyer and founded a non-profit. My home is Calgary, Alberta. Born into a farming family in south-western Ontario. Crossing boundaries is my ‘thing’. Not just geographic boundaries either (though I have worked on projects in over 35 … More About Donna Kennedy-Glans

Repost from CBC: My father’s death, and why we all need to think about what we cost the health-care system

In the midst of my personal grieving, I’m grateful to a health-care system that made my father comfortable in his dying days. He didn’t feel vulnerable. He wasn’t a specimen on a table. He died with dignity.

I am thankful for a system where other people helped pay the price to make that happen. At yet, at the same time, I recognize we can and must create a better system. We need to face reality, but face it together — let’s open up a real conversation.

When it comes to our health-care system here in Alberta, we have choices. We are confronted with hard choices. Collectively, and individually. We can keep pussy-footing around and hope things just get better.

Or we can recognize our blind spots, and take steps in the direction of improving how we actually deliver health care in our province.

But to do so, we must, must, move beyond the way we currently frame the discussion. We need new ideas in the marketplace of ideas. We Albertans need to think about our personal, individual costs to the system. And we also need the marketplace. … More Repost from CBC: My father’s death, and why we all need to think about what we cost the health-care system

Skin in the game

I admire people who put their necks on the line, and share risks. I don’t admire people who try to push off risks, unfairly, to other people. Or people who fake having real skin in the game. And, I get downright formidable when someone with legitimate skin in the game is exploited by someone with no skin in the game, at all.
What skin do you have in the game? Who else has genuine skin in the game, and who doesn’t? And, if someone with no skin in the game is trying to exploit you, here are some ideas! … More Skin in the game

Steeling Up for Slippery Slopes

If you are a Canadian right now (and maybe an American too), you may want to gag. 25% tariffs on steel unless you renegotiate NAFTA the way I want, says Trump.
What can we do? Well, I’m going to suggest something a little old-fashioned. Let’s be prudent. That doesn’t mean we’re uncertain about what’s right. It means being scrupulous about finding the best means to get where we want to go. … More Steeling Up for Slippery Slopes

Un-Canadian #Un🍁

Canada celebrated its 150th birthday last year. Compare what we have to other places, and you’d be hard-pressed not to be grateful. Yet there is a risk that our country will become un-Canadian. Maybe not intentionally. But out of neglect. Out of indifference.  Or our habit of identifying ourselves in contrast to the Americans. 

Lately, I’ve found myself frustrated by happenings in Canada, to Canada, and by Canadians. I’m seeing self-inflicted wounds. Increasingly, I’ve been pointing it out, tagging acts as #Un-Canadian in my Twitter feed and Facebook posts. 

To illustrate, let me share some of what’s, in my humble opinion, un-Canadian. And, I’d like to hear from fellow-Canadians. What are you seeing? Heck, I’d like to hear from anyone with an opinion on what’s happening to Canada & Canadians.

Are we suffering some sort of identity-crisis? Is this something to worry about, or to embrace as growth? … More Un-Canadian #Un🍁